The Linnean House–October

There may not be many leaves changing color here yet, but it is still starting to look like fall at the Missouri Botanical Garden!

The Linnean House–September

Today was a busy day at the Missouri Botanical Garden, because it was the first day of the Japanese Festival! The Linnean House was pretty quiet when they first opened, however, which made it the perfect time to get my photo for the month:

The Linnean House–July

Originally, I had planned on our going to “Flora Borealis” this month, which would have provided me an opportunity for a rare evening photo of the Linnean House. Unfortunately, that didn’t work out, so I took a standard morning picture yesterday…everything is definitely in full bloom!

Next month I should get my evening photo, because I now have our “Flora Borealis” tickets in my possession!

The Linnean House–May

It’s been about a month since we last visited the Missouri Botanical Garden, and in that time, the view outside of the Linnean House sure has changed! The trees and bushes are finally fully green, but the flower beds by the reflecting pools are bare again, as they’re between plantings. I’m looking forward to seeing what will be growing there next month!

The Linnean House–April

It’s finally starting to look like spring in St. Louis!

UPDATE: We returned to the Garden on April 21st for Chinese Culture Days, and I couldn’t believe how much the view had changed less than two weeks later!

The Linnean House–January

Today begins my fourth year of sharing a monthly photo of a Missouri Botanical Garden landmark! I previously photographed the Climatron in 2015, Tower Grove House in 2016, and the Japanese Garden’s Drum Bridge in 2017. This year, I’m going to be looking at how the scenery around the Linnean House changes through the year.

The Linnean House (which was named for Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus), was built in 1882. Its “sister greenhouse” in nearby Tower Grove Park, the Piper Palm House, is actually older than the Linnean House, having been built in 1878, but the Linnean House is the only remaining original greenhouse at the Botanical Garden that was built in Henry Shaw’s day. It also the oldest continually operating public greenhouse west of the Mississippi River!

The Linnean House is one of our favorite places to visit at the Garden. The inside is home to fruit trees (its original function was as an orangery), cacti, and a beautiful collection of camellias. The outside is always beautiful, with seasonal plantings and reflecting pools that not only contain sculptures but are also frequently a display spot for events like Garden Glow and the Lantern Festival. I’m looking forward to watching how the view changes this year, and I certainly got off to a good start with ice and leftover Christmas decorations in the pools outside!