Hot Dog

On National Hot Dog Day, it seems appropriate to share some photos of this “K-9s for Cops” dog we say in Chicago in May. He’s not the first of the public art display we’ve run across, but he was our favorite, because he sits outside a Chicago-style hot dog stand and is covered in hot dog art. Please note: There is no ketchup here, as it should be!

Rainbow Cone

One more sign from our drive through Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood, and it’s the only one from a business we’ve actually patronized! The sign on the back of Rainbow Cone is small-ish, but it’s colorful, and as far as I know, fairly vintage. Plus, Rainbow Cone!

The Original Pancake House: Beverly

The sign at The Original Pancake House in the Beverly neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago might not be as bright and bold as some of its neighbors down the street, but it still has a great vintage shape and fun illustration!

Mr. Submarine

I have some vague memories of Mr. Submarine from my childhood, so I was very excited to see this sign when we were driving through the Beverly neighborhood of Chicago in May!

Janson’s Drive-In

Here’s another great road sign from our trip to Chicago in May:

And a bonus photo of one of their great menu boards:

Maybe someday (next year, perhaps?), we’ll stop and have a meal there!

Fox’s Beverly

This has been a good summer for photographing vintage road signs, and the Beverly neighborhood of Chicago was an especially good location to find a bunch of them, starting with Fox’s Pizza:

The Bronze Cow

I remember well the “Cows on Parade” public art display that hit Chicago two decades ago. I only saw a few of them at the time (and a few more since), but perhaps the interest in public art displays/scavenger hunts that flamed in me during the STL250 Cakeway to the West installation year began as a spark back then. I didn’t know until our most recent visit to Chicago, however, that a bronze cow in on display outside the Chicago Cultural Center to commemorate the event (and now I’m thinking St. Louis needs a bronze cake, but I digress).

If you look into its eyes, you will see the Chicago Picasso sculpture in one, and the historic Chicago water tower (the only public building to survive in the burn zone of the Great Chicago Fire), in the other. And don’t think that the irony of a herd of cows taking over Chicago, a city fabled to have burned because a cow kicked over a lantern, is lost on me!

Chicago Cultural Center

I’m always trying to find new things to do when we visit Chicago, so when we were up there last month, I decided we should visit the Chicago Cultural Center, located at 78 East Washington Street (which is also the corner of Washington and North Michigan Avenue):

It was built in the late 1800s as the city’s central library. That fact is still rather obvious:

The architecture of the building is fantastic, but what it is probably most known for are the two stunning Tiffany glass domes:

There are so many other fantastic details, including mosaics, lamps, and beautiful quotes everywhere:

I’m so glad we finally had a chance to walk through this beautiful and historic building!